Non-communicable Diseases

Non-communicable diseases are emerging as an urgent public health problem globally and becoming a major cause of early death and disability worldwide. This is probably due to the fact that over the past few decades there has been a decline in mortality levels, which may be attributed to the decrease in infant mortality rates, and improved control of infectious diseases through the increase in immunization coverage and improvement in access to health services. These changes have led to a shift from diseases that were associated with under-development, including nutritional, perinatal and infectious diseases, to chronic illnesses including diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Such diseases have a significant burden on the family, community, and society as a whole. The burden of non-communicable diseases is huge and continues to grow. In 2012, non-communicable diseases claimed over 2.2 million lives in the Eastern Mediterranean Region and caused 57% of mortality. Four groups of diseases; cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and chronic lung disease, were responsible for 80% of this mortality, and 65% of deaths were linked to risk factors. About 60% of people with chronic diseases die young, under the age of 70. Future projections indicate there will be an alarming increase in their prevalence with the four main non-communicable diseases causing as many as 2.4 million deaths in 2025, unless serious action is taken.

Training Programs

International Academy of Public Health
5 courses

Noncommunicable Diseases Epidemiology

Program Overview As the leading causes of mortality in the world, non-communicable diseases account...

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International Academy of Public Health
5 courses

Mental Health Epidemiology

Introduction Moreover, 85% of the EMR population is or has been (in the past quarter century) in a...

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